Monthly Archives: February 2010

Call for Papers: Tenth Annual Conference of the Slavic Linguistics Association, April 16

The Department of Slavic Languages
and
the Department of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences
at Brown University present

THE TENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF
THE SLAVIC COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS ASSOCIATION (SCLC-2010)
October 9-11, 2010

The Slavic Cognitive Linguistics Association (SCLA) announces the Call for Papers for the 2010 annual conference. The conference will be held on the campus of Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island) on Saturday, October 9 through Monday, October 11, 2010.

SCLC-2010 Keynote Speakers

Eugene Charniak
Brown University

Adele E. Goldberg
Princeton University

Ronald W. Langacker
University of California, San Diego

CALL FOR PAPERS
Abstracts are invited for presentations addressing issues of significance for cognitive linguistics with some bearing on data from the Slavic languages. As long as there is a cognitive orientation, papers may be on synchronic or diachronic topics in any of the traditional areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, or sociolinguistics. In addition to the Slavic Languages, relevant papers on other languages of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are also acceptable.

Abstracts may be submitted up until the deadline of April 16, 2010 to Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu>. Abstracts should be approximately 500 words, but strict word limits are not required. Notification of acceptance will be provided by May 31, 2010.

Most presentations at SCLC are given in English, but may be in the native (Slavic) language of the presenter. However, if the presentation is not to be made in English we ask that you provide an abstract in English in addition to an abstract in any other SCLA language.

MAIN SESSIONS (Saturday, Sunday, and Monday)
Each presentation for the main sessions will be given 20 minutes and will be followed by a 10-minute discussion period.

PRELIMINARY SCHEDULE
Saturday, October 9: conference panels beginning in the morning and continue throughout the day, evening reception, keynote address, and conference dinner
Sunday, October 10: main sessions and keynote address throughout the day, lunch and dinner
Monday, October 11: main sessions and keynote address with conclusion by noon

FURTHER INFORMATION
Information on transportation, accommodations, and the conference venue will be forthcoming. Please see the conference website for further information.
http://languages.uchicago.edu/scla

Brown University is located in Providence, Rhode Island and is accessible from Boston Logan International Airport (BOS, 55 miles away) or T.F. Green Airport (PVD) in Providence.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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“Golem with Black Bear Combo,” Jewish Klezmer/Rock Band, February 11

Golem with Black Bear Combo plus DJ Gitana Angela & Romasoul Thursday February 11, 2010 @ Martyrs Live,3855 N. Lincoln Ave., Chicago, IL

advance tickets

Golem is neither a towering Jewish Frankenstein who defended the Jews of 17th Century Prague, nor a creature from Lord of the Rings.

Its a young, hip, widely acclaimed New York-based Klezmer/Rock band. The band transforms the music of its Jewish grandparents, making it modern, edgy, sexy and brash.

Their explosive onstage attitude gets Klezmer to rock.   “A Gypsy-punk gem!” – SPIN.com   Appearing with Black Bear Combo, Chicago’s premiere purveyor of Balkan musical madness, plus DJ’s Gitana Angelea and Romasoul, spinning a mix of Gypsy, Balkan and Klezmer for your dancing pleasure.

click here for mp3s, videos and more info.
click here for facebook event
click here for advance tickets

presented by KFAR Jewish Arts Center
and sponsored by Hothouse, Limmud Chicago, Global Groove Chicago & Cultural Con+fusion

Posted in: Chicago Events
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“Post No Bills: Contemporary Polish Posters,” Polish Museum of America, April 16-May 16

The Polish Museum of America presents an exhibition entitled:

Post No Bills: Contemporary Polish Posters

April 16 – May 16, 2010

Opening reception: Friday, April 16, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

A Colorful and intriguing poster exhibition by very talented and accomplished students and faculty from The Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow and Katowice, Poland. Polish poster art has long enjoyed world-wide prestige for its exceptional originality. This show will be among those featured in the Chicago Artropolis program.

Curated by Piotr Kunce and Monika Nowak

The Polish Museum of America

984 N. Milwaukee Ave.

Chicago, IL. 60642

1-773–384-3352

Admission: $ 5

www.PolishMuseumofAmerica.org

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University of Chicago Summer Russian Program 2010

This year, the summer program will run June 21-July 30. In recent years, the summer courses have become important opportunities for students to begin or accelerate their study of Russian, especially for those who didn’t have a chance to begin study in their first-year in the College or who want to get as far ahead as possible in advance of a study abroad program or travel with a FLAG grant. The six-week sequence in either first-year or second-year Russian is equivalent to one academic year of study and will prepare you to continue in our regular Russian program at the second or third year level. In addition, the first-year course will satisfy the College language competency requirement in only six-weeks of study.

Aside from the programs in first-year and second-year Russian, we will again offer a unique course in simultaneous interpretation from English to Russian and Russian to English for students beyond the second-year level. These courses are only offered in the summer program and provide excellent opportunities to improve your speaking and listening skills as well as to gain valuable experience in an area where you may be called upon to use your Russian skills in the future. This course will also advance you one year in our regular Russian program and is appropriate for students who would be at 3rd-year, 4th-year, or 5th-year levels of study.
Full course descriptions are included below. Interested students should contact Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu> or consult the program website for more information: http://languages.uchicago.edu/summerslavic/
All courses are subject to cancellation if sufficient numbers of students do not enroll. A minimum of four students in each section is considered sufficient for course approval. Internal UofC interest is usually high enough to allow us to know well in advance that we will have sufficient numbers of students in the courses to avoid cancellation.
If you do have an interest in one of the summer language courses, please respond to this email and let me know which course you are interested in and if you will POSSIBLY, LIKELY, or DEFINITELY enroll in the program this summer.
If you have an interest in Polish, Czech, or Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, please contact Steven Clancy <sclancy@uchicago.edu> as it may be possible to arrange such courses if there is sufficient demand.
Summer 2010 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
* courses in Russian at the first-year and second-year levels
* two 3-week courses in simultaneous interpretation in Russian<->English (open to students at multiple levels)
* all courses run 6 weeks, June 21-July 30, 2010
* these 6 week courses are equivalent to one year (3 quarters) of study in the UofC program during the academic year
* the first-year courses prepare you to satisfy the undergraduate Language Competency requirement in only 6 weeks of study
* courses will be supplemented by weekly lunches from area Slavic restaurants and possible field trips to Russian, Czech, Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian restaurants, shops, etc. in Chicago
Program descriptions are available at:
and registration and tuition details are available from the Graham School at:
_________________________________________________________
Summer 2010 Slavic Language Program at the University of Chicago
Summer Russian Courses
RUSS 11100     Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11200     Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 11300     Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20101     Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20201     Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 20301     Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading; Instructors: Steven Clancy and Staff
RUSS 21700     Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin
RUSS 21701     Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian); Instructor: Valentina Pichugin

Introductory Russian (1st-year Russian)

RUSS 11100 Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 11200 Intensive Introduction to Russian Langauge and Culture 2

PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN (RUSS 10100-10200-10300).
This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students will also be introduced to Russian culture through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (11100-11200), and will be billed for two courses. This course is suitable for preparing students to satisfy the College Language Competency requirement. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 50 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 11300 “Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

RUSS 11300 Intensive Elementary Russian Conversation and Reading

PREREQUISITES: NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED. STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 11100-11200. This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 11100-11200 “Intensive Introduction to Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 11100-11200. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

Intermediate Russian (2nd-year Russian)

RUSS 20101 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1
RUSS 20201 Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 2

PREREQUISITES: RUSS 10100-10200-10300/RUSS 10400-10500-10600 OR ONE-YEAR KNOWLEDGE OF RUSSIAN REQUIRED. EQUIVALENT TO SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN (RUSS 20100-20200-20300). This six-week course provides a comprehensive continuing course in modern Russian for those who would like to speak Russian or use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Russian culture will be explored through readings, screenings, and city outings. The course provides a year of Russian in two 3-week summer quarter courses.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (90 total contact hours). Students must take both courses in the sequence (20101-20201), and will be billed for two courses. Students with FLAS fellowships require an additional 30 contact hours and are required to take RUSS 20301 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading”. This course is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

RUSS 20301 Intensive Intermediate Russian Conversation and Reading

PREREQUISITES: STUDENTS MUST BE CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED IN RUSS 20011-20012.

This six-week course provides practice in conversation, reading for research, and additional grammar drill complementing material covered in RUSS 20011-20012 “Intensive Intermediate Russian Language and Culture 1 and 2″. All four major communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.

Class meets 2 hours daily, Monday-Thursday (50 total contact hours). There will be one Friday 2-hour session during the first week of class. Students must be concurrently enrolled in RUSS 20011-20012. This course is required for all students with FLAS fellowships and is optional for all other students. [Hyde Park] Sessions I-II (6 weeks) MTWTh 1:00pm-2:50pm

The course is taught by Steven Clancy and Staff. Steven Clancy is Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

Simultaneous Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

PREREQUISITES: FLUENCY IN ENGLISH AND RUSSIAN. STUDENTS WITH NO PRIOR EXPERIENCE IN INTERPRETING WILL WORK FROM THEIR “WEAKER” LANGUAGE INTO THEIR STRONGER; STUDENTS WITH MORE PRACTICE (ADVANCED AND IMMERSION COURSES, TIME LIVING IN RUSSIA, RAISED IN RUSSIAN SPEAKING HOUSEHOLDS, ETC.) WILL PRACTICE BOTH WAYS. This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language, and to identify the passage’s components and establish a logical relationship among them. Students will focus on active listening and concentration skills, memory enhancing techniques, and the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall. Basic elements of note-taking will be discussed as well. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret 3-5 minute extemporaneous passages on familiar topics. During practice sessions students will listen to and repeat the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Topics will cover daily life, current events and the media, as well as general areas of students’ interest.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session I (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

RUSS 21701 Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian)

PREREQUISITES: RUSS 21700 INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETATION, OR EQUIVALENT; CONSENT OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

This course develops skills and improves techniques acquired in RUSS 21700 Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret extemporaneous passages of moderate difficulty derived from professional settings (sources will vary). Basic strategies for simultaneous interpretation will be introduced, and exercises will be provided to help develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time. The students will work to master voice management, and to acquire smooth delivery techniques. Students will learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent interpretation in the target language with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret 8-10 minute passages from public lectures, radio addresses, interviews, news reports, etc.

Class meets 3 hours daily, Monday-Friday (45 total contact hours). [Hyde Park] Session II (3 weeks) MTuWThF 9:30am-12:20pm

The course is taught by Valentina Pichugin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Course Cost: $2800 for academic credit per course or $1905 per course for auditors.

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.), University of Chicago Events
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Anthro. Dept. Seminar Series: “The Social Life of Shrines in the Contemporary Caucasus,” Bruce Grant (NYU), February 8

THE ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT MONDAY SEMINAR SERIES
presents

Bruce Grant

Associate Professor of Anthropology
New York University

speaking on

“The Social Life of Shrines in the Contemporary Caucasus”

Monday, February 8,  3:30 pm  Haskell 315

Here is some background information

BA               1985     McGill (Anthropology)
PhD              1993    Rice (Anthropology)

2004-05  Member, School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

Interests:  Former Soviet Union, Siberia, Caucasus; Azerbaijan; (post-) Soviet nationality policies; expressive culture; state culture; nationalism; shamanism; Islam; historiography; cinema; modernism; histories of anthropology

Selected Publications

1995    In the Soviet House of Culture: A Century of Perestroikas. Princeton U Press. (Winner of the 1996 American Ethnological Society Prize for Best Book in Anthropology by a First Author.)

2009  The Captive and the Gift: Cultural Histories of Sovereignty in Russia and the Caucasus, Cornell U Press

2007   “Brides, Brigands, and Fire-Bringers: Notes Toward a Historical Ethnography of Pluralism,” IN Grant and Yalcim-Heckman, eds, Caucasus Paradigms, 47-74.

2005  “The Good Russian Prisoner: Naturalizing Violence in the Caucasus Mountains,” Cultural Anthropology 20(1): 39-67

2004  “An Average Azeri Village (1930),” Slavic Review 63(4) 705-731

2001  “New Moscow Monuments, or, States of Innocence,” American Ethnologist 28(2): 332-362.

1999  “The Return of the Repressed: Conversations with Three Russian Entrepreneurs,” in G. Marcus, ed., Paranoia within Reason: A Casebook on Conspiracy as Explanation, U Chicago Press, 241-267

1997  “Empire and Savagery: The Politics of Primitivism in Late Imperial Russia,” in Brower & Lazzerini, eds., Russia’s Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917. Indiana U Press 292-310

1993  “Dirges for Soviets Passed: Conversations with Six Russian Writers,” In G. Marcus, ed., Perilous States: Conversations on Culture, Politics, and Nation, U Chicago Press, 17-51

1993  “Siberia Hot and Cold: Reconstructing the Image of Siberian Indigenous Peoples,” in Diment & Slezkine, eds., Between Heaven and Hell: The Myth of Siberia in Russian Culture. St. Martin’s Press, 227-253.

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Bard-Smolny Study Abroad and Summer Program Deadlines Approaching

Bard-Smolny Study Abroad Program
Designed to meet the needs of students who have two or more years of college-level Russian (including heritage speakers), the Bard-Smolny Program in St. Petersburg offers an academically rich environment for students from North American colleges and universities wishing to study in Russia for a semester or for the full academic year.  Students enroll side-by-side with Russian students in classes at Smolny College, the first liberal arts college in Russia.  The Bard-Smolny Program enables students to advance their level of language competency in our Russian as a Second Language (RSL) program while simultaneously taking other academic courses that meet requirements for their B.A. degree at their home college or university.  Smolny College offers courses in 20 academic areas including: art history and architecture; international relations, political studies and human rights; literature, music and performing arts; and sociology and anthropology.

For more information:  http://www.smolny.org/bard-smolny

Summer Language Intensive (SLI)
The Bard-Smolny Summer Language Intensive (SLI) provides challenging courses for students who have completed between two and six semesters of college-level Russian.  Students who enroll in the 4-week program will work on solidifying language concepts already covered while improving language skills.  The 8-week program is the equivalent of one year of Russian at a North American institution.  Language is taught in conjunction with our cultural program, which integrates academic experience with a real feel for the the city of St. Petersburg.  Coursework for upper-level students includes a thematic workshop that focuses on language learning through content-specific instruction such as Russian politics, literature and art history.

For more information:  http://www.smolny.org/bard-smolny/summer/

Application Deadlines

March 1               Summer Language Intensive (SLI)
April 1                  Fall Semester / Academic Year
October 1st          Spring Semester

Posted in: Resources (Funding, Study Abroad, Internships, etc.)
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“Lensless Slides from the Box of Wojtek Gil,” The Polish Museum of America, February 12-23

The Polish Museum of America
984 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago, IL 60642

Lensless Slides from the box of Wojtek Gil
February 12-23, 2010
Curated by Paulina Jakubiec

Wojtek Gil presents a collection of slides each taken by utilizing the camera obscura, a simple unassuming wooden box with a hole and a single sheet of film.

Opening Reception:
Friday, February 12, 7-9pm

$5 suggested donation

www.PolishMuseumOfAmerica.org

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Call for Proposals: “The Turks and Islam,” Indiana University, Deadline: May 1

Call for Proposals: “The Turks and Islam”
The Indiana University Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies Chair will host a
multidisciplinary international conference entitled “The Turks and Islam” on
September 11, 2010 in Bloomington, IN, USA. The conference will explore the
many aspects of the Turkic-speaking peoples’ interactions with Islam
throughout the centuries. Scholars, independent researchers, and advanced
graduate students of all disciplines are encouraged to send paper proposals
(approximately 200 words) along with brief CVs to Professor Kemal Silay
(tsp@indiana.edu). All papers presented at the conference will be considered
for publication in an edited volume.

Deadline for proposals: May 1, 2010.

Posted in: Calls for Papers and Upcoming Conferences
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Anatole Kolomayets Exhibition Opening, Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, February 1

February 1, 2010
Ukranian Institute of Modern Art
2320 W. Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL
Anatole Kolomayets Exhibition Opening

The Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art welcomes an exhibition of paintings from Ukrainian/Chicago artist, Anatole Kolomayets. Born in the Poltava region of Ukraine, Kolomayets (b.1927) relocated to Chicago upon graduation from the Royal Academy of Arts in Liege, Belgium, 1954. He has since firmly established himself as an artist in Chicago within the international community. His work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and he was one of the founders of the Ukrainian Artists’ Group “Monolith”, active in Chicago 1954-1958. This exhibition will focus on a selection of works from the last two decades. Intuitively selecting stylistic traces from both his Ukrainian heritage and his artistic training in Europe, Kolomayets has forged a distinct aesthetic that harmoniously blends tradition, experience, and innovation.

Exhibit running through March 28, 2010

Event Cost: $5

Hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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