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2014-15 Courses Approved for the Jewish Studies Major/Minor

Please click here for an archive of past courses.

Click here to be re-directed to the College Catalog.

Interested students may also consult the graduate course page, as some graduate courses in Jewish Studies may be open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor.

Visit the Chicago Center for Jewish Studies website for a constantly updated list of courses in Jewish Studies. Many graduate courses open to undergraduates are not listed until the summer prior to the new academic year.

ARAM 10101 (= JWSC 11000). Biblical Aramaic. PQ: Second-year standing and knowledge of Classical Hebrew. Course in Biblical Aramaic. S. Creason. Autumn.

ARAM 10102 (= JWSC 11100). Old Aramaic Inscriptions. PQ: Second-year standing and ARAM 10101. Course in Old Aramaic Inscriptions. S. Creason. Spring.

ARAM 10103 (= JWSC 11200). Imperial Aramaic. PQ: Second-year standing and ARAM 10102. Course in Imperial Aramaic. S. Creason. Winter.

CHDV 27317 (= JWSC 24500, CRES 27317). America’s White Ethnics: Contemporary Italian- and Jewish-American Ethnic Identities. Using American Italians and Jews as case studies, this course investigates what it means to be a white “ethnic” in the contemporary American context and examines what constitutes an ethnic identity. In the mid-20th century, the long-standing ideal of an American melting-pot began to recede. The rise of racial pride, ushered in by the Civil Rights era, made way for the emergence of ethnic identity/pride movements, and multiculturalisms, more broadly, became privileged. To some extent, in the latter half of the 20th century America became a post-assimilationist society and culture, where many still strived to “fit-in,” but it was no longer necessarily the ideal to “blend-in” or lose one’s ethnic trappings. In this context, it has become not only possible, but often desirable, to be at the same time American, white, and an ethnic. Through the investigation of the Jewish and Italian examples, this discussion-style course will look at how ethnicity is manifested in, for example, class, religion, gender, nostalgia, and place, as well as how each of these categories is in turn constitutive of ethnic identity. The course will illustrate that there is no fixed endpoint of assimilation or acculturation, after which a given individual is fully “American,” but that ethnic identity, and its various constituent elements, persists and perpetually evolves, impacting individual identities and experience, and both local/group specific and larger cultural narratives even many generations after immigration. L. Shapiro. Autumn.

CMLT 20401/30401 (= JWSC 20006, NEHC 20406/30406, RLST 20406, RLIT 30406, FNDL 20415). Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry. N. Rokem. Winter.

CRES 20001 (= JWSC 20001, HIST 22113, NEHC 20401/30401, RLST 20604). Jewish History and Society I: The Archaeology of Israel – History, Society, Politics. The course will offer a historical and critical perspective on 150 years of archaeology in Israel/Palestine, beginning with the first scientific endeavors of the 19th century and covering British Mandate and pre-state Jewish scholarship, as well as developments in the archaeology of Israel since 1948. I will devote particular attention to the mutual construction of archaeological interpretation and Israeli identity and to the contested role of archaeology in the public sphere both within Israeli society and in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will conclude with a discussion of the plausibility and possible content of an indigenous post-conflict archaeology in Israel and Palestine, based on 21st century paradigm shifts in archaeological discourse and field work. R. Greenberg. Spring.

CRES 27317 (= JWSC 24500, CHDV 27317). America’s White Ethnics: Contemporary Italian- and Jewish-American Ethnic Identities. Using American Italians and Jews as case studies, this course investigates what it means to be a white “ethnic” in the contemporary American context and examines what constitutes an ethnic identity. In the mid-20th century, the long-standing ideal of an American melting-pot began to recede. The rise of racial pride, ushered in by the Civil Rights era, made way for the emergence of ethnic identity/pride movements, and multiculturalisms, more broadly, became privileged. To some extent, in the latter half of the 20th century America became a post-assimilationist society and culture, where many still strived to “fit-in,” but it was no longer necessarily the ideal to “blend-in” or lose one’s ethnic trappings. In this context, it has become not only possible, but often desirable, to be at the same time American, white, and an ethnic. Through the investigation of the Jewish and Italian examples, this discussion-style course will look at how ethnicity is manifested in, for example, class, religion, gender, nostalgia, and place, as well as how each of these categories is in turn constitutive of ethnic identity. The course will illustrate that there is no fixed endpoint of assimilation or acculturation, after which a given individual is fully “American,” but that ethnic identity, and its various constituent elements, persists and perpetually evolves, impacting individual identities and experience, and both local/group specific and larger cultural narratives even many generations after immigration. L. Shapiro. Autumn.

FNDL 20415 (= JWSC 20006, NEHC 20406/30406, CMLT 20401/30401, RLIT 30406, RLST 20406). Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry. N. Rokem. Winter.

GRMN 23510 (= JWSC 26310, HIST 23515, SLAV 23510). Their Brothers’ Rights: Western and Eastern Jews in the Long Nineteenth Century. The course deals with interventions by “Western” Jewries on behalf of Jewish communities in the “East,” especially imperial Russia and the Ottoman Empire, between the Congress of Vienna (1814–1815) and the eve of the First World War. The course will follow two axes of interpretation: first, the global conditions established through international relations, focusing on the principle of the balance of power and accompanied by conferences and congresses; second, from the mid-nineteenth century onward, the transformation from intercession by notables to a kind of nongovernmental Jewish diplomacy undertaken by organizations promoting education, welfare, and civil equality. D. Diner. Spring.

GRMN 28914/38914 (=JWSC 28914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, MUSI 28914/38914, TAPS 28417). Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter. In July 2015 the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’ Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor. D. Levin and S. Magal. Autumn.

HEBR 10101 (=JWSC 22000). Elementary Classical Hebrew I. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Autumn.

HEBR 10102 (= JWSC 22100). Elementary Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 10101 or equivalent. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Winter. 

HEBR 10103 (= JWSC 22200). Elementary Classical Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 10102 or equivalent. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Spring.

HEBR 10501 (= JWSC 25000). Introductory Modern Hebrew I. A. Almog. Autumn.

HEBR 10502 (= JWSC 25100). Introductory Modern Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 10501 or equivalent. A. Almog. Winter.

HEBR 10503 (= JWSC 25200). Introductory Modern Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 10502 or equivalent. A. Almog. Spring.

HEBR 20104 (= JWSC 22300). Intermediate Classical Hebrew I. PQ: HEBR 10103 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Autumn.

HEBR 20105 (= JWSC 22400). Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20104 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Winter.

HEBR 20106 (= JWSC 22500). Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20105 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Spring.

HEBR 20301 (= JWSC 22201). Tannaitic Hebrew Texts I. PQ: Some basic knowledge of biblical and/or modern Hebrew, and consent of instructor. N. Golb. Autumn.

HEBR 20302 (= JWSC 22302). Tannaitic Hebrew Texts II. PQ: HEBR 20301 and consent of instructor. N. Golb. Autumn.

HEBR 20501 (= JWSC 25300). Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. PQ: HEBR 10503 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Autumn.

HEBR 20502 (= JWSC 25400). Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20501 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Winter.

HEBR 20503 (= JWSC 25500). Intermediate Modern Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 20502 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Spring.

HIST 22113 (= CRES 20001, JWSC 20001, NEHC 20401/30401, RLST 20604). Jewish History and Society I: The Archaeology of Israel – History, Society, Politics. The course will offer a historical and critical perspective on 150 years of archaeology in Israel/Palestine, beginning with the first scientific endeavors of the 19th century and covering British Mandate and pre-state Jewish scholarship, as well as developments in the archaeology of Israel since 1948. I will devote particular attention to the mutual construction of archaeological interpretation and Israeli identity and to the contested role of archaeology in the public sphere both within Israeli society and in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will conclude with a discussion of the plausibility and possible content of an indigenous post-conflict archaeology in Israel and Palestine, based on 21st century paradigm shifts in archaeological discourse and field work. R. Greenberg. Spring.

HIST 22202 (= JWSC 20003, NEHC 20403/30403, RLST 20605). Jewish History and Society III: Israel Society and Jewish Cultures – Religiosity, Nation, Migration. The class will discuss the connections between Israeli history and Jewish history. We will explore the history of the state since its establishment, its intellectual elites, their cultural production, as well as the protests, demonstrations, and sit-ins organized by Israeli Jews in Israel during the years 1948-2012. The class will reflect on tensions between Israelis of different origins, Mizrahi, Ashkenazi and Ethiopian communities in particular, and will discuss whether the arrival of various communities of Jews to Israel signified a liberating exodus from an oppressive  exile; we will therefore consider different periodizations of Israeli history in which the moment of arrival to Israel of various migrants/’olim (like Holocaust survivors, Mizrahi Jews, and others) marked the beginning of a difficult journey, aimed at achieving social mobility and citizenship rights in the Jewish state. We will also look at conflicts based on religion, especially the encounters between Haredi, national-religious and secular Jews in Israel. Finally, we will explore Israel’s relations with its Palestinian citizens and the Palestinian subjects in the occupied West Bank. The class will consider instances of politicized violence in Israel, and reflect on the ways in which their analysis could inform our thinking about social identities, nationalism, and religiosity. We will try to read against, and beyond, national Zionist narratives; unpack many national silences regarding the social and economic tensions embodied in these events, and study their implications with respect to visions of pluralism, binationalism, integration, and nationalism in Israel. O. Bashkin. Autumn.

HIST 22406 (= JWSC 20002, NEHC 20402/30402, RLST 25801). Jewish History and Society II: Messianism and Modernity. This course will consider the changing function of the notion of the messiah as it developed and changed in the modern era.  It takes as its concrete starting point the Sabbatian Heresy of the 17th century and concludes with Derrida’s philosophical development of the concept of the messianic. The course’s aim is to use messianism as a focal point around which to consider the dynamic relationship between philosophy and Jewish civilization. It will examine the changing representations of the the Messiah within the history of Jewish civilization. Concurrently it will consider the after-effect of these representations on discourses of modernity and vice-versa, illustrating both how Enlightenment conceptions of progress helped to create the notion of “messianism” understood as an abstract idea, and how the modern/post-modern philosophical conception of the “messianic” as a force that interrupts time is dependent upon historical studies of the messianic dimension of traditional Judaism. S. Hammerschlag. Winter.

HIST 23515 (= JWSC 26310, GRMN 23510, SLAV 23510). Their Brothers’ Rights: Western and Eastern Jews in the Long Nineteenth Century. The course deals with interventions by “Western” Jewries on behalf of Jewish communities in the “East,” especially imperial Russia and the Ottoman Empire, between the Congress of Vienna (1814–1815) and the eve of the First World War. The course will follow two axes of interpretation: first, the global conditions established through international relations, focusing on the principle of the balance of power and accompanied by conferences and congresses; second, from the mid-nineteenth century onward, the transformation from intercession by notables to a kind of nongovernmental Jewish diplomacy undertaken by organizations promoting education, welfare, and civil equality. D. Diner. Spring.
HIST 26214/36214 (= JWSC 26214, LACS 25100/35100). The Social Memory of “Convivencia”: Muslims, Jews, and Christians and Historical Nationalism in Contemporary Spain. PQ: Spanish reading proficiency (preferred for some assigned readings) or reading proficiency in Arabic or Hebrew. Convivencia is a word that describes the multicultural and social environment created by the existence of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities in medieval Spain. This course aims to examine both this circumstance and its social memory: how and why contemporary narratives have dealt with this historical issue, usually portrayed as a mirror or a precedent for present day situations in which different religious and cultural communities share the same political and social arena. The course is conceived as a dialogue between the past and the present, between the evidence from remote times and the conflicting perceptions, interpretations, and misconceptions that are built upon this evidence. In so doing, the objective is to address a number of pressing questions regarding the uses and abuses of history, its role as forger of identities, communities, or values, and, more particularly, the difficult relations of contemporary Spain with its own past. E. Manzano. Autumn.

HUMA 23200 (= JWSC 23200, NEHC 20413/30413). Medieval Jewish History III. PQ: NEHC 20412. N. Golb. Spring.

ITAL 25115/35115 (= JWSC 26115, HIJD 35115, DVPR 35115, PHIL 25115/35115, RLST 25115). Topics in the Philosophy of Religion: Challenge of Suffering from Job to Primo Levi. This course will focus on authors from the Jewish tradition, although some attention will be given to Catholic and Protestant perspectives as found, for example, in liberation theology and in certain forms of religious existentialism. We will look at the various ways in which contemporary philosophers of Judaism have dealt with suffering, evil, and God, especially after the experience of the Shoah. We will examine the often repeated claim that Judaism has approached the philosophical and religious challenges of suffering more through an ethics of suffering than on the basis of a metaphysics of suffering. After an introductory discussion of Maimonides on the Boo of Job, readings for the course may come from authors such as E. Levinas, J. B. Soloveitchik, Y. Leibowitz, H. Jonas, A. Lichtenstein, D.W. Halivni, D. Shatz, and E. Berkovits. The course will culminate in a philosophical analysis of some of the most important writings of Primo Levi. A. Davidson. Winter.

JWSC 11000 (= ARAM 10101). Biblical Aramaic. PQ: Second-year standing and knowledge of Classical Hebrew. Course in Biblical Aramaic. S. Creason. Autumn.

JWSC 11100 (= ARAM 10102). Old Aramaic Inscriptions. PQ: Second-year standing and ARAM 10101. Course in Old Aramaic Inscriptions. S. Creason. Spring.

JWSC 11200 (= ARAM 10103). Imperial Aramaic. PQ: Second-year standing and ARAM 10102. Course in Imperial Aramaic. S. Creason. Winter.

JWSC 20001-20002-20003. Jewish History and Society I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students explore the ancient, medieval, and modern phases of Jewish culture(s) by means of documents and artifacts that illuminate the rhythms of daily life in changing economic, social, and political contexts. Texts in English.

JWSC 20001 (= CRES 20001, HIST 22113, NEHC 20401/30401, RLST 20604). Jewish History and Society I: The Archaeology of Israel – History, Society, Politics. The course will offer a historical and critical perspective on 150 years of archaeology in Israel/Palestine, beginning with the first scientific endeavors of the 19th century and covering British Mandate and pre-state Jewish scholarship, as well as developments in the archaeology of Israel since 1948. I will devote particular attention to the mutual construction of archaeological interpretation and Israeli identity and to the contested role of archaeology in the public sphere both within Israeli society and in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will conclude with a discussion of the plausibility and possible content of an indigenous post-conflict archaeology in Israel and Palestine, based on 21st century paradigm shifts in archaeological discourse and field work. R. Greenberg. Spring.

JWSC 20002 (= HIST 22406, NEHC 20402/30402, RLST 25801). Jewish History and Society II: Messianism and Modernity. This course will consider the changing function of the notion of the messiah as it developed and changed in the modern era.  It takes as its concrete starting point the Sabbatian Heresy of the 17th century and concludes with Derrida’s philosophical development of the concept of the messianic. The course’s aim is to use messianism as a focal point around which to consider the dynamic relationship between philosophy and Jewish civilization. It will examine the changing representations of the the Messiah within the history of Jewish civilization. Concurrently it will consider the after-effect of these representations on discourses of modernity and vice-versa, illustrating both how Enlightenment conceptions of progress helped to create the notion of “messianism” understood as an abstract idea, and how the modern/post-modern philosophical conception of the “messianic” as a force that interrupts time is dependent upon historical studies of the messianic dimension of traditional Judaism. S. Hammerschlag. Winter.

JWSC 20003 (= HIST 22202, NEHC 20403/30403, RLST 20605). Jewish History and Society III: Israel Society and Jewish Cultures – Religiosity, Nation, Migration. The class will discuss the connections between Israeli history and Jewish history. We will explore the history of the state since its establishment, its intellectual elites, their cultural production, as well as the protests, demonstrations, and sit-ins organized by Israeli Jews in Israel during the years 1948-2012. The class will reflect on tensions between Israelis of different origins, Mizrahi, Ashkenazi and Ethiopian communities in particular, and will discuss whether the arrival of various communities of Jews to Israel signified a liberating exodus from an oppressive  exile; we will therefore consider different periodizations of Israeli history in which the moment of arrival to Israel of various migrants/’olim (like Holocaust survivors, Mizrahi Jews, and others) marked the beginning of a difficult journey, aimed at achieving social mobility and citizenship rights in the Jewish state. We will also look at conflicts based on religion, especially the encounters between Haredi, national-religious and secular Jews in Israel. Finally, we will explore Israel’s relations with its Palestinian citizens and the Palestinian subjects in the occupied West Bank. The class will consider instances of politicized violence in Israel, and reflect on the ways in which their analysis could inform our thinking about social identities, nationalism, and religiosity. We will try to read against, and beyond, national Zionist narratives; unpack many national silences regarding the social and economic tensions embodied in these events, and study their implications with respect to visions of pluralism, binationalism, integration, and nationalism in Israel. O. Bashkin. Autumn.

JWSC 20004-20005-20006. Jewish Thought and Literature I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students in this sequence explore Jewish thought and literature from ancient times until the modern era through a close reading of original sources. A wide variety of works is discussed, including the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and texts representative of rabbinic Judaism, medieval Jewish philosophy, and modern Jewish culture in its diverse manifestations. Texts in English.

JWSC 20004 (= NEHC 20404/30404, RLST 11005, BIBL 31000). Jewish Thought and Literature I: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. The course will survey the contents of all twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible, and introduce critical questions regarding its central and marginal figures, events, and ideas, its literary qualities and anomalies, the history of its composition and transmission, its relation to other artifacts from the biblical period, its place in the history and society of ancient Israel, and its relation to the larger culture of the ancient Near East. S. Chavel. Autumn.

JWSC 20005 (= NEHC 20405/30405, RLST 20408). Jewish Thought and Literature II: The Bible and Archaeology. In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa. We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70. No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies is required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20004 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible) in the Autumn Quarter. D. Schloen. Spring.

JWSC 20006 (= NEHC 20406/30406, CMLT 20401/30401, RLST 20406, RLIT 30406, FNDL 20415). Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry. N. Rokem. Winter.

JWSC 20300-20400-20500. Elementary Yiddish I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to develop proficiency in Yiddish reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Touchstones of global Yiddish culture are also introduced through song, film, and contemporary Yiddish websites.

JWSC 20300 (=YDDH 10100/37300, LGLN 27200) Elementary Yiddish I. S. Yudkoff. Autumn.

JWSC 20400 (=YDDH 10200/37400, LGLN 27300). Elementary Yiddish II. PQ: YDDH 10100/37300 or consent of instructor.  S. Yudkoff. Winter.

JWSC 20500. (=YDDH 10300/37500, LGLN 27400). Elementary Yiddish III. PQ: YDDH 10200/37400 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Spring.

JWSC 20911 (= RLST 20911, HIJD 30911, NEHC 20491). Jews and Judaism in the Classical Era and Late Antiquity: From Temple to Text, from “Land” to “Torah.” This course will address the thousand-year evolvement of post-Biblical Judaism from a Temple and Land orientation to the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism. The first section of the course will focus on the political and cultural effects of the Hellenistic and early Roman periods on Jews and Judaism, with a stress placed not only on the social and political developments in Judea but on the early stages and subsequent growth of Jewish diaspora communities as well. In this context special attention will be given to the variegated literary corpus produced by Jews both in Judea and the diaspora. The second section will analyze the changes in Jewish life and self-identity in the aftermath of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Second Temple in 70CE, and the gradual emergence of Rabbinic Judaism as an alternative expression of Jewish religious commitment. The Roman Empire’s embracing of Christianity on the one hand, and the growing assertiveness of a Babylonian Rabbinic community on the other, will also be closely examined. I. Gafni. Winter.

JWSC 22000-22100-22200. Elementary Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read biblical Hebrew prose with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments: (1) the first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis); and (2) the third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

JWSC 22000 (=HEBR 10101). Elementary Classical Hebrew I. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Autumn.

JWSC 22100 (= HEBR 10102). Elementary Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 10101 or equivalent. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Winter. 

JWSC 22200 (= HEBR 10103). Elementary Classical Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 10102 or equivalent. Note: This class meets 5 times per week. S. Creason. Spring. 

JWSC 22201-22302. Tannaitic Hebrew Texts I-II.

This course consists of readings in the Mishnah and Tosefta, the main corpus of legal and juridical texts assembled by the Palestinian academic masters during the second and early third centuries. Goals are to introduce: (1) views and opinions of early rabbinic scholars who flourished in the period immediately following that of the writers of the Dead Sea Scrolls; (2) aspects of the material culture of the Palestinian Jews during that same period; and (3) grammar and vocabulary of what is generally called “early rabbinic Hebrew” and thereby to facilitate the ability to read and understand unvocalized Hebrew texts.

JWSC 22201 (= HEBR 20301). Tannaitic Hebrew Texts I. PQ: Some basic knowledge of biblical and/or modern Hebrew, and consent of instructor. N. Golb. Autumn.

JWSC 22302 (= HEBR 20302). Tannaitic Hebrew Texts II. PQ: HEBR 20301 and consent of instructor. N. Golb. Autumn.

JWSC 22300-22400-22500. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

JWSC 22300 (= HEBR 20104). Intermediate Classical Hebrew I. PQ: HEBR 10103 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Autumn.

JWSC 22400 (= HEBR 20105). Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20104 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Winter.

JWSC 22500 (= HEBR 20106). Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20105 or equivalent. D. Pardee. Spring.

JWSC 23000-23100-23200. Medieval Jewish History I-II-III.

This sequence does NOT meet the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence deals with the history of the Jews over a wide geographical and historical range. First-quarter work is concerned with the rise of early rabbinic Judaism and development of the Jewish communities in Palestine and the Eastern and Western diasporas during the first several centuries CE. Topics include the legal status of the Jews in the Roman world, the rise of rabbinic Judaism, the rabbinic literature of Palestine in that context, the spread of rabbinic Judaism, the rise and decline of competing centers of Jewish hegemony, the introduction of Hebrew language and culture beyond the confines of their original home, and the impact of the birth of Islam on the political and cultural status of the Jews. An attempt is made to evaluate the main characteristics of Jewish belief and social concepts in the formative periods of Judaism as it developed beyond its original geographical boundaries. Second-quarter work is concerned with the Jews under Islam, both in Eastern and Western Caliphates. Third-quarter work is concerned with the Jews of Western Europe from the eleventh through the fifteenth centuries.

JWSC 23000 (= NEHC 20411/30411). Medieval Jewish History I. N. Golb. Autumn.

JWSC 23100 (= NEHC 20412/30412). Medieval Jewish History II. PQ: NEHC 20411. N. Golb. Winter.

JWSC 23200 (= NEHC 20413/30413, HUMA 23200). Medieval Jewish History III. PQ: NEHC 20412. N. Golb. Spring.

JWSC 24500 (= CHDV 27317, CRES 27317). America’s White Ethnics: Contemporary Italian- and Jewish-American Ethnic Identities. Using American Italians and Jews as case studies, this course investigates what it means to be a white “ethnic” in the contemporary American context and examines what constitutes an ethnic identity. In the mid-20th century, the long-standing ideal of an American melting-pot began to recede. The rise of racial pride, ushered in by the Civil Rights era, made way for the emergence of ethnic identity/pride movements, and multiculturalisms, more broadly, became privileged. To some extent, in the latter half of the 20th century America became a post-assimilationist society and culture, where many still strived to “fit-in,” but it was no longer necessarily the ideal to “blend-in” or lose one’s ethnic trappings. In this context, it has become not only possible, but often desirable, to be at the same time American, white, and an ethnic. Through the investigation of the Jewish and Italian examples, this discussion-style course will look at how ethnicity is manifested in, for example, class, religion, gender, nostalgia, and place, as well as how each of these categories is in turn constitutive of ethnic identity. The course will illustrate that there is no fixed endpoint of assimilation or acculturation, after which a given individual is fully “American,” but that ethnic identity, and its various constituent elements, persists and perpetually evolves, impacting individual identities and experience, and both local/group specific and larger cultural narratives even many generations after immigration. L. Shapiro. Autumn.

JWSC 25000-25100-25200. Introductory Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

This three quarter course introduces students to reading, writing, and speaking modern Hebrew. All four language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of nondiacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; and speaking. Students learn the Hebrew root pattern system and the seven basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses, as well as simple future. At the end of the year, students can conduct short conversations in Hebrew, read materials designed to their level, and write short essay.

JWSC 25000 (= HEBR 10501). Introductory Modern Hebrew I. A. Almog. Autumn.

JWSC 25100. (= HEBR 10502). Introductory Modern Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 10501 or equivalent. A. Almog. Winter.

JWSC 25200. (= HEBR 10503). Introductory Modern Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 10502 or equivalent. A. Almog. Spring.

JWSC 25300-25400-25500. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

The main objective of this course is to provide students with the skills necessary to approach modern Hebrew prose, both fiction and nonfiction. In order to achieve this task, students are provided with a systematic examination of the complete verb structure. Many syntactic structures are introduced (e.g., simple clauses, coordinate and compound sentences). At this level, students not only write and speak extensively but are also required to analyze grammatically and contextually all of material assigned.

JWSC 25300 (= HEBR 20501). Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. PQ: HEBR 10503 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Autumn.

JWSC 25400 (= HEBR 20502). Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. PQ: HEBR 20501 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Winter.

JWSC 25500 (= HEBR 20503). Intermediate Modern Hebrew III. PQ: HEBR 20502 or equivalent. Note: The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses. A. Almog. Spring.

JWSC 25600-25700-25800. Advanced Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content of the intermediate level. The main objective is literary fluency. The texts used in this course include both academic prose, as well as literature. Students are exposed to semantics and morphology in addition to advanced grammar.

JWSC 25600 (=HEBR 30501). Advanced Modern Hebrew I. PQ: HEBR 20503 or equivalent. N. Rokem. Autumn.

JWSC 25700 (=HEBR 30502). Advanced Modern Hebrew II. PQ: JWSC 25600 or equivalent. I. Schacham. Winter.

JWSC 25800 (=HEBR 30503). Advanced Modern Hebrew III. PQ: JWSC 25700 or equivalent. I. Schacham. Spring.

JWSC 26115 (= RLST 26115, HIJD 35115, DVPR 35115, PHIL 25115/35115, ITAL 25115/35115). Topics in the Philosophy of Religion: Challenge of Suffering from Job to Primo Levi. This course will focus on authors from the Jewish tradition, although some attention will be given to Catholic and Protestant perspectives as found, for example, in liberation theology and in certain forms of religious existentialism. We will look at the various ways in which contemporary philosophers of Judaism have dealt with suffering, evil, and God, especially after the experience of the Shoah. We will examine the often repeated claim that Judaism has approached the philosophical and religious challenges of suffering more through an ethics of suffering than on the basis of a metaphysics of suffering. After an introductory discussion of Maimonides on the Boo of Job, readings for the course may come from authors such as E. Levinas, J. B. Soloveitchik, Y. Leibowitz, H. Jonas, A. Lichtenstein, D.W. Halivni, D. Shatz, and E. Berkovits. The course will culminate in a philosophical analysis of some of the most important writings of Primo Levi. A. Davidson. Winter.

JWSC 26214 (= LACS 25100/35100, HIST 26214/36214). The Social Memory of “Convivencia”: Muslims, Jews, and Christians and Historical Nationalism in Contemporary Spain. PQ: Spanish reading proficiency (preferred for some assigned readings) or reading proficiency in Arabic or Hebrew. Convivencia is a word that describes the multicultural and social environment created by the existence of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities in medieval Spain. This course aims to examine both this circumstance and its social memory: how and why contemporary narratives have dealt with this historical issue, usually portrayed as a mirror or a precedent for present day situations in which different religious and cultural communities share the same political and social arena. The course is conceived as a dialogue between the past and the present, between the evidence from remote times and the conflicting perceptions, interpretations, and misconceptions that are built upon this evidence. In so doing, the objective is to address a number of pressing questions regarding the uses and abuses of history, its role as forger of identities, communities, or values, and, more particularly, the difficult relations of contemporary Spain with its own past. E. Manzano. Autumn.

JWSC 26310 (=HIST 23515, GRMN 23510, SLAV 23510). Their Brothers’ Rights: Western and Eastern Jews in the Long Nineteenth Century. The course deals with interventions by “Western” Jewries on behalf of Jewish communities in the “East,” especially imperial Russia and the Ottoman Empire, between the Congress of Vienna (1814–1815) and the eve of the First World War. The course will follow two axes of interpretation: first, the global conditions established through international relations, focusing on the principle of the balance of power and accompanied by conferences and congresses; second, from the mid-nineteenth century onward, the transformation from intercession by notables to a kind of nongovernmental Jewish diplomacy undertaken by organizations promoting education, welfare, and civil equality. D. Diner. Spring.

JWSC 26600 (= PLSC 28500). Zionism and Palestine. PQ: Consent of instructor. Enrollment limited.This course has three broad aims, the first of which is to explore the various strands of early Zionist thinking in Europe during the late 19th and early 20th century. The second aim is to analyze how the European Zionists who came to Palestine created the Jewish state in the first half of the 20th century. The third aim is to examine some key developments in Israel’s history since it gained its independence in 1948. While the main focus will be on Zionism and the state of Israel, considerable attention will be paid to the plight of the Palestinians and the development of Palestinian nationalism over the past century. J. Mearsheimer. Spring.

JWSC 27301-27401. Intermediate Yiddish I-II.

This sequence combines an intensive review of grammar with the acquisition of more advanced grammatical concepts. Specific attention is paid to regional variants in grammar and orthography. Students develop their reading and writing skills by focusing their attention on the literature of the Yiddish press and the work of Abe Cahan.

JWSC 27301 (=YDDH 20100/39500). Intermediate Yiddish I. PQ: YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Autumn.

JWSC 27401 (=YDDH 20200/39600). Intermediate Yiddish II. PQ: YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Winter.

JWSC 28914 (=GRMN 28914/38914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, MUSI 28914/38914, TAPS 28417). Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter. In July 2015 the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’ Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor. D. Levin and S. Magal. Autumn.

JWSC 29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and undergraduate program adviser. Note: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring

JWSC 29900. BA Paper Preparation Course. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and undergraduate program adviser. Note: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Required of honors candidates. May be taken for P/F grading with consent of instructor. Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring.

LACS 25100/35100 (= JWSC 26214, HIST 26214/36214). The Social Memory of “Convivencia”: Muslims, Jews, and Christians and Historical Nationalism in Contemporary Spain. PQ: Spanish reading proficiency (preferred for some assigned readings) or reading proficiency in Arabic or Hebrew. Convivencia is a word that describes the multicultural and social environment created by the existence of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities in medieval Spain. This course aims to examine both this circumstance and its social memory: how and why contemporary narratives have dealt with this historical issue, usually portrayed as a mirror or a precedent for present day situations in which different religious and cultural communities share the same political and social arena. The course is conceived as a dialogue between the past and the present, between the evidence from remote times and the conflicting perceptions, interpretations, and misconceptions that are built upon this evidence. In so doing, the objective is to address a number of pressing questions regarding the uses and abuses of history, its role as forger of identities, communities, or values, and, more particularly, the difficult relations of contemporary Spain with its own past. E. Manzano. Autumn.

LGLN 27200 (= JWSC 20300, YDDH 10100/37300) Elementary Yiddish I. S. Yudkoff. Autumn.

LGLN 27300 (=YDDH 10200/37400, JWSC 20400). Elementary Yiddish II. PQ: YDDH 10100/37300 or consent of instructor.  S. Yudkoff. Winter.

LGLN 27400 (=YDDH 10300/37500, JWSC 20500). Elementary Yiddish III. PQ: YDDH 10200/37400 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Spring.

MUSI 28914/38914 (=GRMN 28914/38914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, JWSC 28914 , TAPS 28417). Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter. In July 2015 the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’ Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor. D. Levin and S. Magal. Autumn.

NEHC 20401/30401 (= CRES 20001, HIST 22113, JWSC 20001, RLST 20604). Jewish History and Society I: The Archaeology of Israel – History, Society, Politics. The course will offer a historical and critical perspective on 150 years of archaeology in Israel/Palestine, beginning with the first scientific endeavors of the 19th century and covering British Mandate and pre-state Jewish scholarship, as well as developments in the archaeology of Israel since 1948. I will devote particular attention to the mutual construction of archaeological interpretation and Israeli identity and to the contested role of archaeology in the public sphere both within Israeli society and in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will conclude with a discussion of the plausibility and possible content of an indigenous post-conflict archaeology in Israel and Palestine, based on 21st century paradigm shifts in archaeological discourse and field work. R. Greenberg. Spring.

NEHC 20402/30402 (= JWSC 20002, HIST 22406, RLST 25801). Jewish History and Society II: Messianism and Modernity. This course will consider the changing function of the notion of the messiah as it developed and changed in the modern era.  It takes as its concrete starting point the Sabbatian Heresy of the 17th century and concludes with Derrida’s philosophical development of the concept of the messianic. The course’s aim is to use messianism as a focal point around which to consider the dynamic relationship between philosophy and Jewish civilization. It will examine the changing representations of the the Messiah within the history of Jewish civilization. Concurrently it will consider the after-effect of these representations on discourses of modernity and vice-versa, illustrating both how Enlightenment conceptions of progress helped to create the notion of “messianism” understood as an abstract idea, and how the modern/post-modern philosophical conception of the “messianic” as a force that interrupts time is dependent upon historical studies of the messianic dimension of traditional Judaism. S. Hammerschlag. Winter.

NEHC 20403/30403 (= JWSC 20003, HIST 22202, RLST 20605). Jewish History and Society III: Israel Society and Jewish Cultures – Religiosity, Nation, Migration. The class will discuss the connections between Israeli history and Jewish history. We will explore the history of the state since its establishment, its intellectual elites, their cultural production, as well as the protests, demonstrations, and sit-ins organized by Israeli Jews in Israel during the years 1948-2012. The class will reflect on tensions between Israelis of different origins, Mizrahi, Ashkenazi and Ethiopian communities in particular, and will discuss whether the arrival of various communities of Jews to Israel signified a liberating exodus from an oppressive  exile; we will therefore consider different periodizations of Israeli history in which the moment of arrival to Israel of various migrants/’olim (like Holocaust survivors, Mizrahi Jews, and others) marked the beginning of a difficult journey, aimed at achieving social mobility and citizenship rights in the Jewish state. We will also look at conflicts based on religion, especially the encounters between Haredi, national-religious and secular Jews in Israel. Finally, we will explore Israel’s relations with its Palestinian citizens and the Palestinian subjects in the occupied West Bank. The class will consider instances of politicized violence in Israel, and reflect on the ways in which their analysis could inform our thinking about social identities, nationalism, and religiosity. We will try to read against, and beyond, national Zionist narratives; unpack many national silences regarding the social and economic tensions embodied in these events, and study their implications with respect to visions of pluralism, binationalism, integration, and nationalism in Israel. O. Bashkin. Autumn.

NEHC 20404/30404 (= JWSC 20004, RLST 11005, BIBL 31000). Jewish Thought and Literature I: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. The course will survey the contents of all twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible, and introduce critical questions regarding its central and marginal figures, events, and ideas, its literary qualities and anomalies, the history of its composition and transmission, its relation to other artifacts from the biblical period, its place in the history and society of ancient Israel, and its relation to the larger culture of the ancient Near East. S. Chavel. Autumn.

NEHC 20405/30405 (= JWSC 20005, RLST 20408). Jewish Thought and Literature II: The Bible and Archaeology. In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa. We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70. No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies is required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20004 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible) in the Autumn Quarter. D. Schloen. Spring.

NEHC 20406/30406 (= JWSC 20006, CMLT 20401/30401, RLST 20406, RLIT 30406, FNDL 20415). Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry. N. Rokem. Winter.

NEHC 20411/30411 (= JWSC 23000). Medieval Jewish History I. N. Golb. Autumn.

NEHC 20412/30412 (= JWSC 23100). Medieval Jewish History II. PQ: NEHC 20411. N. Golb. Winter.

NEHC 20413/30413 (= JWSC 23200, HUMA 23200). Medieval Jewish History III. PQ: NEHC 20412. N. Golb. Spring.

NEHC 20491 (= JWSC 20911, HIJD 30911, RLST 20911). Jews and Judaism in the Classical Era and Late Antiquity: From Temple to Text, from “Land” to “Torah.” This course will address the thousand-year evolvement of post-Biblical Judaism from a Temple and Land orientation to the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism. The first section of the course will focus on the political and cultural effects of the Hellenistic and early Roman periods on Jews and Judaism, with a stress placed not only on the social and political developments in Judea but on the early stages and subsequent growth of Jewish diaspora communities as well. In this context special attention will be given to the variegated literary corpus produced by Jews both in Judea and the diaspora. The second section will analyze the changes in Jewish life and self-identity in the aftermath of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Second Temple in 70CE, and the gradual emergence of Rabbinic Judaism as an alternative expression of Jewish religious commitment. The Roman Empire’s embracing of Christianity on the one hand, and the growing assertiveness of a Babylonian Rabbinic community on the other, will also be closely examined. I. Gafni. Winter.

PHIL 25115/35115 (= JWSC 26115, HIJD 35115, DVPR 35115, ITAL 25115/35115, RLST 25115). Topics in the Philosophy of Religion: Challenge of Suffering from Job to Primo Levi. This course will focus on authors from the Jewish tradition, although some attention will be given to Catholic and Protestant perspectives as found, for example, in liberation theology and in certain forms of religious existentialism. We will look at the various ways in which contemporary philosophers of Judaism have dealt with suffering, evil, and God, especially after the experience of the Shoah. We will examine the often repeated claim that Judaism has approached the philosophical and religious challenges of suffering more through an ethics of suffering than on the basis of a metaphysics of suffering. After an introductory discussion of Maimonides on the Boo of Job, readings for the course may come from authors such as E. Levinas, J. B. Soloveitchik, Y. Leibowitz, H. Jonas, A. Lichtenstein, D.W. Halivni, D. Shatz, and E. Berkovits. The course will culminate in a philosophical analysis of some of the most important writings of Primo Levi. A. Davidson. Winter.

RLST 11005 (=JWSC 20004, BIBL 31000). Jewish Thought and Literature I: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. The course will survey the contents of all twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible, and introduce critical questions regarding its central and marginal figures, events, and ideas, its literary qualities and anomalies, the history of its composition and transmission, its relation to other artifacts from the biblical period, its place in the history and society of ancient Israel, and its relation to the larger culture of the ancient Near East. S. Chavel. Autumn.

RLST 20406 (= JWSC 20006, NEHC 20406/30406, CMLT 20401/30401, RLIT 30406, FNDL 20415). Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry. N. Rokem. Winter.

RLST 20408 (= JWSC 20005, NEHC 20405/30405). Jewish Thought and Literature II: The Bible and Archaeology. In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa. We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70. No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies is required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20004 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible) in the Autumn Quarter. D. Schloen. Spring.

RLST 20604 (= CRES 20001, HIST 22113, JWSC 20001, NEHC 20401/30401). Jewish History and Society I: The Archaeology of Israel – History, Society, Politics. The course will offer a historical and critical perspective on 150 years of archaeology in Israel/Palestine, beginning with the first scientific endeavors of the 19th century and covering British Mandate and pre-state Jewish scholarship, as well as developments in the archaeology of Israel since 1948. I will devote particular attention to the mutual construction of archaeological interpretation and Israeli identity and to the contested role of archaeology in the public sphere both within Israeli society and in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will conclude with a discussion of the plausibility and possible content of an indigenous post-conflict archaeology in Israel and Palestine, based on 21st century paradigm shifts in archaeological discourse and field work. R. Greenberg. Spring.

RLST 20605 (= JWSC 20003, HIST 22202, NEHC 20403/30403). Jewish History and Society III: Israel Society and Jewish Cultures – Religiosity, Nation, Migration. The class will discuss the connections between Israeli history and Jewish history. We will explore the history of the state since its establishment, its intellectual elites, their cultural production, as well as the protests, demonstrations, and sit-ins organized by Israeli Jews in Israel during the years 1948-2012. The class will reflect on tensions between Israelis of different origins, Mizrahi, Ashkenazi and Ethiopian communities in particular, and will discuss whether the arrival of various communities of Jews to Israel signified a liberating exodus from an oppressive  exile; we will therefore consider different periodizations of Israeli history in which the moment of arrival to Israel of various migrants/’olim (like Holocaust survivors, Mizrahi Jews, and others) marked the beginning of a difficult journey, aimed at achieving social mobility and citizenship rights in the Jewish state. We will also look at conflicts based on religion, especially the encounters between Haredi, national-religious and secular Jews in Israel. Finally, we will explore Israel’s relations with its Palestinian citizens and the Palestinian subjects in the occupied West Bank. The class will consider instances of politicized violence in Israel, and reflect on the ways in which their analysis could inform our thinking about social identities, nationalism, and religiosity. We will try to read against, and beyond, national Zionist narratives; unpack many national silences regarding the social and economic tensions embodied in these events, and study their implications with respect to visions of pluralism, binationalism, integration, and nationalism in Israel. O. Bashkin. Autumn.

RLST 20911 (= JWSC 20911, HIJD 30911, NEHC 20491). Jews and Judaism in the Classical Era and Late Antiquity: From Temple to Text, from “Land” to “Torah.” This course will address the thousand-year evolvement of post-Biblical Judaism from a Temple and Land orientation to the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism. The first section of the course will focus on the political and cultural effects of the Hellenistic and early Roman periods on Jews and Judaism, with a stress placed not only on the social and political developments in Judea but on the early stages and subsequent growth of Jewish diaspora communities as well. In this context special attention will be given to the variegated literary corpus produced by Jews both in Judea and the diaspora. The second section will analyze the changes in Jewish life and self-identity in the aftermath of the destruction of Jerusalem and the Second Temple in 70CE, and the gradual emergence of Rabbinic Judaism as an alternative expression of Jewish religious commitment. The Roman Empire’s embracing of Christianity on the one hand, and the growing assertiveness of a Babylonian Rabbinic community on the other, will also be closely examined. I. Gafni. Winter.

RLST 25115 (= JWSC 26115, HIJD 35115, DVPR 35115, PHIL 25115/35115, ITAL 25115/35115). Topics in the Philosophy of Religion: Challenge of Suffering from Job to Primo Levi. This course will focus on authors from the Jewish tradition, although some attention will be given to Catholic and Protestant perspectives as found, for example, in liberation theology and in certain forms of religious existentialism. We will look at the various ways in which contemporary philosophers of Judaism have dealt with suffering, evil, and God, especially after the experience of the Shoah. We will examine the often repeated claim that Judaism has approached the philosophical and religious challenges of suffering more through an ethics of suffering than on the basis of a metaphysics of suffering. After an introductory discussion of Maimonides on the Boo of Job, readings for the course may come from authors such as E. Levinas, J. B. Soloveitchik, Y. Leibowitz, H. Jonas, A. Lichtenstein, D.W. Halivni, D. Shatz, and E. Berkovits. The course will culminate in a philosophical analysis of some of the most important writings of Primo Levi. A. Davidson. Winter.

RLST 25801 (= JWSC 20002, HIST 22406, NEHC 20402/30402). Jewish History and Society II: Messianism and Modernity. This course will consider the changing function of the notion of the messiah as it developed and changed in the modern era.  It takes as its concrete starting point the Sabbatian Heresy of the 17th century and concludes with Derrida’s philosophical development of the concept of the messianic. The course’s aim is to use messianism as a focal point around which to consider the dynamic relationship between philosophy and Jewish civilization. It will examine the changing representations of the the Messiah within the history of Jewish civilization. Concurrently it will consider the after-effect of these representations on discourses of modernity and vice-versa, illustrating both how Enlightenment conceptions of progress helped to create the notion of “messianism” understood as an abstract idea, and how the modern/post-modern philosophical conception of the “messianic” as a force that interrupts time is dependent upon historical studies of the messianic dimension of traditional Judaism. S. Hammerschlag. Winter.

RLST 28914 (=GRMN 28914/38914, RLIT 38914, MUSI 28914/38914, TAPS 28417, JWSC 28914). Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter. In July 2015 the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’ Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor. D. Levin and S. Magal. Autumn.

SLAV 23510 (= JWSC 26310, HIST 23515, GRMN 23510). Their Brothers’ Rights: Western and Eastern Jews in the Long Nineteenth Century. The course deals with interventions by “Western” Jewries on behalf of Jewish communities in the “East,” especially imperial Russia and the Ottoman Empire, between the Congress of Vienna (1814–1815) and the eve of the First World War. The course will follow two axes of interpretation: first, the global conditions established through international relations, focusing on the principle of the balance of power and accompanied by conferences and congresses; second, from the mid-nineteenth century onward, the transformation from intercession by notables to a kind of nongovernmental Jewish diplomacy undertaken by organizations promoting education, welfare, and civil equality. D. Diner. Spring.

TAPS 28417 (=JWSC 28914, RLST 28914, RLIT 38914, MUSI 28914/38914, GRMN 28914/38914). Munich-Chicago Performance Laboratory: Jephta’s Daughter. In July 2015 the Bavarian State Opera in Munich will present the world premiere of a piece tentatively titled Jephta’s Daughter to be directed by Saar Magal and conceived by Magal in collaboration with U of C professor David Levin. In the autumn quarter, Magal and Levin will offer a laboratory course in which to prepare the piece. As presently conceived, the piece will combine theater, dance, oratorio, film, contemporary composition, and a variety of contemporary performance idioms to adapt and interrogate the story of Jephta’s daughter (in the Book of Judges, from which the story is adapted, she remains nameless). We are hoping to attract students keen to explore a broad cross-section of materials through seminar-style discussion and experimentation on stage (we will work through biblical criticism, films like Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers (2013) or Ulrich Seidl’s Paradise: Love-Faith-Hope, operas like Mozart’s Idomeneo, oratorios like Handel’s Jephta and Carrisimi’s Jephte, and a range of critical theory, including Rene Girard’s Violence and the Sacred and Derek Hughes’ Culture and Sacrifice). Stage work will encompass improvisational, physical, and text-based work. Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: adaptation, theater practice, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing. Undergraduate students require consent of instructor. D. Levin and S. Magal. Autumn.

YDDH 10100/37300 (= JWSC 20300, LGLN 27200) Elementary Yiddish I. S. Yudkoff. Autumn.

YDDH 10200/37400 (= LGLN 27300, JWSC 20400). Elementary Yiddish II. PQ: YDDH 10100/37300 or consent of instructor.  S. Yudkoff. Winter.

YDDH 10300/37500 (= LGLN 27400, JWSC 20500). Elementary Yiddish III. PQ: YDDH 10200/37400 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Spring.

YDDH 20100/39500 (= JWSC 27301). Intermediate Yiddish I. PQ: YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Autumn.

YDDH 20200/39600 (= JWSC 27401). Intermediate Yiddish II. PQ: YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors. S. Yudkoff. Winter.