About

 

The Center for the Art of East Asia was established in 2003 with support from the Division of the Humanities to facilitate and support teaching and research in the rapidly growing field of East Asian Art at the University of Chicago.

The center draws inspiration from trends in both traditional history and contemporary culture. East Asian art traditions have emerged and been redefined throughout history by cultural interactions. New archeological finds provide evidence of this cross-fertilization over several millennia. In the contemporary world, East Asian societies of006 Korea, Japan, and China are interacting to an ever-greater extent with other nations and are playing larger roles in contemporary culture and international affairs. Scholars and artists from these areas have a growing impact in the areas of art, culture and international studies. This concentration of interest in Asian art and visual culture is redefining the parameters of East Asian art history. In response to these developments, we have adopted a global outlook and encourage new perspectives and are organizing international collaborative research projects that include universities, museums, and experts around the world.

The Center seeks to:

  • Serve and foster the growing interest in East Asian art and visual culture in a global context in both the academic community and for a wider audience.
  • Develop research programs that span disciplinary, geographical, and institutional boundaries.
  • Encourage new approaches and open pathways to underexplored areas of study through sharing information, research materials, and methodologies.
  • Initiate projects in collaboration with other universities, research centers, and individual scholars, providing arenas for scholarly interaction.
  • Develop new visual technologies in teaching and researching East Asian art and visual culture; through establishing digital databases of both ancient and contemporary images.

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By , September 9, 2009 10:57 am

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