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Fukushima Watch: What Do Deformed Butterflies Mean for Humans in Fukushima? via The Wall Street Journal

So what does this mean for humans? Not much, apparently.

Different species have different degrees of resistance to radiation. Even among insects, some species such as silk moths and melon flies are known to be highly resistant to radiation. “We just don’t know (about the likely impact on humans). Radiation sensitivity varies among species,” Prof. Otaki said.

Prof. Shinzo Kimura of Dokkyo Medical University, one of Japan’s best known radiation experts, agrees. “It is very inappropriate to apply the conclusion of this study to humans,” he said. “That doesn’t mean we can ignore the safety risks of low level radiation, however.”

Many Fukushima residents are unable to move away from the area for financial reasons and continue to stay in the parts of the prefecture that are not off-limits.

Read this post in Japanese/日本語訳はこちら≫

Read more at Fukushima Watch: What Do Deformed Butterflies Mean for Humans in Fukushima?

♢ Related article:

The biological impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the pale grass blue butterfly via Scientific Reports

Posted in *English.


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