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Nuclear Energy and Reproductive Labor – The Task of Feminism via Japan-Fissures in the Planetary Apparatus

原発と再生産労働——フェミニズムの課題 松本麻里インタヴュー
日本語による原文も同エントリ内に掲載されています)

An Interview with Mari Matsumoto

(June 12, 2011 in Tokyo)

Jfissures = J
Matsumoto=M

J: The 11th of June was the global day of anti-nuke action and there was a large demonstration in Tokyo, in which we participated. Can you talk about other types of actions besides street protests?

M: First of all, keep in mind that I am not aware of all kinds of activities during the past three months. As of today it has been three months since the nuclear accident, and at this point we have a new series of action among women in more invisible fields in comparison to protests in the street and governmental buildings. We can say that this is a new movement of parents who are engaged in reproductive labor. Here in Tokyo even, 250km away from Fukushima, this kind of movement has also begun. During the past three months, we have come to realize that we can no longer rely on our government that has totally neglected in taking adequate safety measures, and that we can no longer trust the safety myths played out by the nuclear industry. So the parents who grew concerned about their environment for raising kids started exchanging information, forming study groups to learn about radiation, buying their own Geiger counters to monitor radioactivities in their neighborhood; parks, kindergartens, sandboxes and so on. They are also negotiating with local schools to start monitoring radioactivities, and for the safety of school lunch, they are appealing to or negotiating with local governments. Learning from Chernobyl it is certain that the effects of radioactivity is several times more harmful to children and youth than to adults. This is even a consensus among such organizations as WHO, but the Japanese government managed to ignore it by setting up lax measures for children.

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