Hannah on History: 2014 MAPH History Museum Internship

September 18th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

From day one of the program, my fellow MAPHers and I were told about the coveted MAPH Internships and what great opportunities they offered upon graduation; just nine months away! I was eager to apply to these internships (indeed I planned on applying to ALL of them; I had jobs on my mind from the beginning!) yet as coursework began I found myself absolutely absorbed in my fascinating classes and my priorities changed. » Read the rest of this entry «

Learning How to Read with Browne & Miller: Emily Nordling on her MAPH Internship

August 27th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Fine-Arts-BuildingBefore my internship with Browne and Miller Literary Associates, I had glimpsed the world of publishing from a few different angles. However, from my first day setting foot in the historic Fine Arts building in downtown Chicago, I discovered that my work as writer, editor, and reviewer barely gleaned the surface of this vast and rapidly changing industry.

Researching and preparing weekly reports on digital publishing introduced me to conflicts I may have otherwise ignored, whose ideas and outcomes will inevitably change the face of publishing. B&M’s agents (Danielle Egan-Miller, Joanna MacKenzie, and Abby Saul) and assistant (Molly Foltyn) were eager to share their experiences, putting the ideas I was learning squarely into their real life context. For instance: » Read the rest of this entry «

Let’s Get Working: Chicago Celebrates Studs Terkel

May 1st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Spring-2014-Arts-GuideIf you live in Chicago, you may already know about next week’s Let’s Get Working: Chicago Celebrates Studs Terkel. The festival, which runs from May 9-11, will feature screenings, concerts, talks, art installations, talks, performances, oral histories–all celebrating the incomparable Studs Terkel.* There has been a lot of attention surrounding  “Reinventing Radio – An Evening with Ira Glass” and the “Let’s Get Working” concert put on by The Hideout, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, the Logan Center, and the Haymarket Brewery, but we have also compiled a list of other highlights in light of the sheer number of things going on (see below). You should check these out.

And, in case you need more reasons to come: MAPH preceptor Paul Durica is the Festival Program Coordinator and Mitch Marr (MAPH ’10), Harrison Sherrod (MAPH’13), Amanda Scotese (MAPH ’13), Ingrid Haftel (MAPH ’10) and Nick Fraccaro (MAPH ’10) are all working on this. Ohhhh, MAPH…

Some Highlights:

Friday, May 9: » Read the rest of this entry «

MAPH goes to ARTBAR!

November 25th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

ARTBAR logo on white rgb

On Friday, December 6th, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm,

join MAPH students and alumni for ARTBAR, an evening of socializing, drinks, live performance, and art activities at the

Hyde Park Art Center
(5020 S. Cornell Avenue Chicago, IL 60615).

The evening will include:

  • Hands on art-making in 2 of the following media: clay, screenprinting, and photography,
  • An improv, pop-up, interactive comedy club performance put on by  artists exhibiting work in the Michelle Grabner-curated “A Study in Midwestern Appropriation,”
  • Drinks, snacks, and socializing, in the spirit of MAPH Social Hour,
  • An introduction to the Hyde Park Art Center and its programs for MAPH alumni and students by the Art Center’s Marketing & Communications Manager and MAPH alum Brook Rosini,
  • DJ and open mic,
  • and time to explore the art galleries!

MAPH has covered all the costs for MAPH students and alumni, but please feel free to make additional donations to the Art Center! 

ARTBAR Club Nutz event

 

The Chicago Manual: 2013 MAPH Grads in Newcity

September 24th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

chicago-manual-cover3-283x300Reaching out to the city’s newcomers, this week’s Newcity (“The Chicago Manual”) explores life at UChicago and in the South Side.  The issue features pieces by three 2013 MAPHers: Greg Langen’s reflections on the value of embracing CTA-derived anonymity, Amanda Scotese’s guide to on-campus architecture, and Charlie Puckett’s breakdown of an exciting new Hyde Park establishment. » Read the rest of this entry «

A Day in the Life: An Externship at the Hyde Park Art Center

August 23rd, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Here is a post from Keri Asma, MA ’13,on her recent externship to the Hyde Park Art Center. Keri is also one of the MAPH mentors for the upcoming year, so you’ll probably be hearing from her fairly often.

Externships are opportunities for recently graduated or current Master’s and PhD students to shadow alumni in various careers for a day. Rather like extended informational interviews, externships provide students with a chance to explore a particular profession, no prior experience necessary. If you are interested in learning more about externships through the University of Chicago, visit the CAPS website here: https://careeradvancement.uchicago.edu/jobs-internships-research/graduate-student-externships.

 

The Hyde Park Art Center is, as many of you probably know, a perfect example of the possible intersections between art, community, education, and humanistic inquiry. My externship at the center this summer not only gave me a sense of the individual work of MAPH Alumnae Kate Lorenz and Brook Rosini, but also provided a holistic picture of how their work contributes to a much larger project—one which like MAPH is centered on creating a community which can engage critically, passionately, and excitedly with the arts.

This post will be something between an introduction/plug for the HPAC, a reflection on what I learned, and an encouragement for doing externships. This is just one account of engaging with alumni, with the community, with the arts; there are probably lots more out there.*

» Read the rest of this entry «

Public History & Public Humanities: A tale of two MAs

January 15th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

The following post is an essay written by Lara Kelland (AM’02) and her doctoral colleague Anne Parsons. Lara and Anne are frequent contributors to the National Council on Pubic History’s “History @Work” blog. Public history is a professional field that engages the tools of academic history towards the creation of public projects such as museums, historic houses, digital projects, documentaries, and the like.

” ‘MUSEI WORMIANI HISTORIA’, THE FRONTISPIECE FROM THE MUSEUM WORMIANUM DEPICTING OLE WORM’S CABINET OF CURIOSITIES.”

In our last History@Work post, we charted the recent burst of academic public history jobs in the past few years. This year’s job market has continued the trend, with thirty jobs seeking either major or minor public history specialties posted on the Academic Wiki. It is yet to be seen whether this increase in job postings reflects a sustainable boom or a short-lived bubble. Regardless, this growth of public history jobs signals a visible interest in the field in dozens of history departments across the country, raising significant questions regarding the overproduction of undergraduate and graduate students in public history.

One of the major concerns of expanding public history training is that many museums and historic institutions are currently facing major budget cuts, and so we are training new public historians for a field which is under siege. As the NCPH and the wider profession continue to discuss longstanding issues of graduate training in public history, we want to suggest a broadening of public history training. Public history already trains students in research and writing, preservation, and project management among other things. By incorporating more of a public humanities approach, we could train students even more broadly for a wider array of fields. At this moment of growth, public historians have an opportunity to think about new directions, including broadening the definitions of what public history is and what it encompasses.

Some universities have begun to re-imagine graduate training more expansively in the public humanities, which are broadly defined as projects that engage the public in the humanist fields of “history, philosophy, popular culture and the arts.” Public humanities programs such as those at the BrownNYU and University of Chicago infuse students with the belief that they can bring the specialized ideas of academic debate into the public sphere and inspire new visions about a more flexible curriculum and broad training. The growth of these programs demonstrates the expansive possibility of training the next generation of public historians not as possessors of a bound set of skills, but rather as flexible professionals who can work in a variety of cultural and non-profit settings. The majority of public history job listings call for experience in museum studies, historic preservation, and archival training. But the research, writing and public engagement skills of public historian would also work well in teaching, journalism, the arts and non-profit organizations.

As young public history professionals we come to this discussion mindful of our own experiences at the master’s level, one of us in public history and the other in public humanities. Anne received her MA in public history at New York University, a program that resides largely in the history department. The program provided her with a strong skill set for museum work and public history scholarship. In contrast, Lara trained at the University of Chicago in its Master of Arts Program in Humanities, designing an interdisciplinary degree that brought together different skill sets to her museum studies inquiry. The public humanities degree at University of Chicago, for instance, allowed students to design their own degree in various disciplines, enabling students to train themselves in ways that would be useful for their intended profession. A similar sentiment was expressed at the meeting of this past year’s NCPH Working Group on Imagining New Careers in Public History, where discussion about training MAs with business skills flourished. We might greatly benefit from looking to public humanities programs as a model for teaching students transferrable skills and broad cultural approaches. In one example, the University of Chicago’s MAPH program consistently places students in publishing, journalism, and teaching jobs, as well as other cultural sector jobs in visual and dramatic arts and public humanities organizations. According to one administrator of the program, graduates of broad humanities training are well-positioned to connect ideas generated within the academy to public spaces, events, and projects.

» Read the rest of this entry «

MAPH Alum Helps Chicago Welcome Home the Troops

November 2nd, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

Cristopher De Phillips and Laurie Ipsen in front of City Hall in Chicago

Cristopher De Phillips (MAPH 2009) arrived at UChicago as a MAPH student in 2008. Even now, he remembers cold and cloudy days in January. “I’d say to myself–’This thesis is never going to get done.’”

As Founder and Director of Chicago Welcomes Home the Heroes, De Phillips now finds himself in familiar circumstances–looking ahead to the execution of a difficult project whose scope seems to continuously widen–though the task that he’s set in front of himself can seem even more challenging. Along with co-founder Laurie Ipsen, De Phillips is spearheading the effort to plan and execute America’s largest welcome-home parade for veterans of America’s post-9/11 wars (THIS DECEMBER 15IN DOWNTOWN CHICAGO). The organization will also host a screening of the documentary film Hell and Back at the Reva and David Logan Center on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 (6PM), with a panel discussion to follow.

MAPH students and alumni are welcome to attend all of the events.

All of this amounts to a huge set of logistical challenges that has demanded collaboration with civic, government, non-profit, and corporate interests (Chicago Welcomes Home the Heroes secured their first major sponsor in United Health Care on the day that I met with De Phillips and Ipsen here in Hyde Park).

De Phillips jokes that he has confidence that the work will get done in part because of his experience writing that MAPH thesis project–a project that likely seems less daunting when observed in the rear-view mirror.

He became interested in the idea of a Chicago parade after seeing Rachel Maddow’s coverage of Saint Louis’s event–which attracted roughly 100,000 people. It may seem like an unlikely calling for a MAPH alum–especially one without any firsthand experience of military life (neither De Phillips nor Ipsen has been in the armed forces). But this logistically complicated and emotional process has become the focus of De Phillips’s professional life during the past year. » Read the rest of this entry «

My Kind of Town: A Discussion of Police Torture in Chicago

May 17th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

On Tuesday, May 22nd at 6:00 pm at the brand new Logan Center,  MAPH is co-sponsoring a panel discussion on Chicago police torture.

In moment when the relevance of the humanities is being challenged, it is a great opportunity to have a conversation about what the role of journalism or a play might be in a public dialogue about a serious social concern like torture. We hope this will be the start of future discussion-based events for current students and alumni to keep discussing at the role of the humanities in the academy and the world at large.

The event will feature John Conroy, the Chicago journalist who covered the Chicago police torture scandal, who has now written a play inspired by the cases he covered. His book on torture, Unspeakable Acts, Ordinary People is often taught in courses at the university.  In addition to John, panelists will include CraigFutterman, founder of the Civil Rights and Police Accountability Project at the University of Chicago, Former Chicago Police Superintendent Richard Brzeczek, People’s Law Office founding partner G. Flint Taylor and will be moderated by WBEZ’s Kelly Kleiman.

At the start of the evening actors will perform a scene from the play as a spark for discussion and there will be a period for questions and discussion from the audience. A reception will follow the event.

We hope those living in Chicago will make the time to join us for this conversation.

 

 

Upcoming Alumni Events

August 16th, 2011 § 2 comments § permalink

Generic Chicago Picture

This fall, join us for at least two (!) alumni events in Chicago. And stay tuned, MAPH is taking the “Clark Street Ale House Reality Experience” on the road. We’ll be hosting alumni events in Cities That Are Not Chicago this year. We’re thinking about New York in the Fall. Would people come to a MAPH alumni Holiday Party in New York? (What are these magical events? Find out after the jump…) » Read the rest of this entry «

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