MAPHers featured in latest issue of Tableau—twice!

May 16th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

The people and projects of MAPH are profiled in two articles in the latest issue of Tableau, the Humanities Division of UChicago’s biyearly magazine.

Joanna MacKenzie (AM’02) of Browne & Miller Literary Agency is profiled in the latest issue of Tableau.

Come Together“ profiles Colloquium, MAPH’s new online journal that features exemplary, wide-ranging work by MAPH students, alumni and staff. This is not the first mention of Colloquium in other publications—if you’re itching for more meta on the magazine, check out this interview with its founders in The University of Chicago MagazineThe Tableau article has come out just in time for the journal’s second issue, which is set to launch on Friday! Don’t miss it!

Publish and Flourish,” an article on UChicago Humanities alumni who work in the publishing industry, features three MAPH grads who are making it in publishing. Ellen Grafton (AM’11), Allison Wright (AM’08), and Joanna MacKenzie (AM’02) offer their practiced advice on how to get hired and succeed in book publishing. Ellen and Allison moved to New York to get into the business—Ellen is now Assistant Managing Editor of the children’s division at Simon and Schuster, and Allison is the US Dictionaries Editor at Oxford University Press. Joanna put down roots in Chicago, and she works as a literary agent at Browne and Miller Literary Associates—the same company where MAPH provides a paid summer internship for one current student every year.

Those are just two of the publications that are profiling MAPH alumni and projects. Know of other places MAPH alumni are popping up? Contact us!

Teaching the Body – Naomi Slipp (MAPH ’09) on her upcoming exhibit

November 15th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

Naomi Slipp (MAPH ’09) is a current PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art & Architecture at Boston University. As a facet of her studies, she has been planning an exhibition on American art and artistic anatomy, the topic of her dissertation research, since the spring of 2010. Directly inspired by her MAPH thesis written on the bronze anatomical casts of Thomas Eakins at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the two-month long exhibition Teaching the Body: Artistic Anatomy in the American Academy from Copley, Rimmer, and Eakins to Contemporary Artists, opens January 31, 2013 at the Boston University Art Gallery and includes over eighty works of art (many never exhibited before), extensive public programming, and an illustrated catalogue with scholarly essays.

She says of the project: “I feel inspired by artistic anatomy because these works of art visualize the uncharted and wondrous terrain of the human body, not some distant volcano or historical event, but the miraculous, complex mechanisms operating within ourselves. The study of anatomy also, historically, has brought together doctors and artists who sought to explore this corporeal space together.”

Because of this, she is also very excited about the opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration around the exhibition topic. She says: “I want to create a dialogue between these two commonly polarized fields (art and science). To that end, we are initiating collaborative programming with Massachusetts General Hospital, the College of Fine Arts, the BU Medical College & the Center for Science & Medical Journalism at Boston University, and the Massachusetts College of Art & Design. I hope to unite this diverse audience, bringing together people who are interested in art and those who are interested in medicine for a rich, shared conversation about what it means to occupy, treat, & picture our own bodies.”

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Revival, Nostalgia, and Angels in America

February 22nd, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

Reposted from the Court Theatre Blog.  The first part of Angels in America opens  March 30, 2012

The World Only Spins Forward

by Deborah Blumenthal  MAPH ’11

Above: ACT UP New York advertisement, 1969, 1982-1997 (bulk 1987-1995).

Above: ACT UP New York advertisement, 1969, 1982-1997 (bulk 1987-1995).

 

I was seventeen when I first saw Angels in America, and it did, as it does, change how I saw the world. It was the magnificent HBO miniseries; I remember two cold, snowy Sunday evenings, tip-toeing around my house, covertly staying up far past my school-night bedtime to see it, and from my naive perch among the couch pillows, watching an entire unfamiliar history unfold from the glow of my Dad’s big-screen TV.

I don’t know that my parents would have let me watch it if they had known what it was, but it was almost by accident, really. I had tuned in just to see one of my favorite then-obscure stage actors on television, none the wiser to what I was about to see, other than that it had been adapted from a play I had never seen.

My most distinct memory from either of those two evenings is that I couldn’t sleep after watching the ending of Millennium Approaches. Not that I was afraid of an angel crashing through my ceiling (though of course you never know), but because Prior was so sick, and I was so scared. Watching it became, very quickly, about much more than just a beloved actor. Recorded VHS tapes were joined immediately by paperback copies and DVDs, a few years later by working copies for thesis notes and a holiday-gifted first edition. There’s a Tony Kushner section on my bookshelf, and each resident is worn with love.

I was born during the period in which Angels in America takes place. Having grown up in a school system that ignored, or at least sugarcoated, the existence of the AIDS crisis (I did have one teacher—elementary school art—who taught second and third graders about Keith Haring, much to the chagrin of some parents), encountering some of the AIDS plays as a teenager—first Angels, and a few months later, Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart, with Rent sandwiched in between—was like opening a pop-up book. Even in my high school health classes, AIDS was just a bad thing that happened to you if you didn’t use a condom, in no major way separated from  other STDs. The curriculum gave some clinical biology, here’s what happens to your cells, but the politics and the details and the terrifying history were left out, and real understanding was foregone.

It’s not uncommon to hear from people my age, or even younger, that Angels in America changed their lives—which might be strange considering that we weren’t there. But for us it’s like a history lesson, live in living color, opening our eyes to a reality that we can only try to imagine. Progressive sex-ed or sugarcoated evasion, the AIDS epidemic has become incorporated into our cultural consciousness. My generation has no idea what it was like for it to barely even have a name. The immersion of the theater may be the closest we’ll ever get to understanding.

More on Angels in America after 20 years after the jump

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Alumna Sarah Best Reflects on Art, MAPH and Invites Everyone to Dance Films Kino

January 26th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

Sarah Best Self Portrait

Dance Films Kino is a three-week project that I am presenting as an artist in residence at Hyde Park Art Center, March 4-25, 2012. Over three weeks, I will present 30 works of dance on film, as well as over a dozen live music, dance, and literary readings. All of the programs will be free to the public.

The seeds of this project were planted ten years ago, back when I was a MAPH student sitting in Yuri Tsivian’s intro to film class, learning about how filmmakers whose works were censored, or considered to be too experimental for mainstream distribution, showed films out of their own homes.

The films and performance I am presenting will be shown in an environment inspired by “kinos”, underground, avant-grade art clubs of the 1920s and 30s. I’m currently getting ready to paint the walls of my residency studio red, put out the caberet tables, and art deco objects I’ve sourced from Etsy. I’m creating artwork inspired by movement to hang on the walls of the space.

My first goal is to show movies in a place that feels like someone’s home, so that people are a little more willing to give something they’ve never seen before a try. My second goal is to bring all kinds of artists, writers, musicians, dance makers and filmmakers together to create a lot of different points of access into the work.

My third goal is to invite people to help create the space by imagining what it would be like to be a part of an underground society, to feel nostalgia for a fictional place situated in the past. I think there is a collective desire to engage in this type of activity. I think it is part of the reason why bars inspired by speakeasies are so popular, and why people like to fantasize about travel, even in tough economic times.

More on how Sarah arrived at this point after the jump

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The Path from MAPH to Running an Online Art Gallery

December 5th, 2011 § 1 comment § permalink

Drew Messinger-Michaels (MAPH ’10)

Drew Messinger-Michaels  ’10

 

Some Gallery Somewhere

It’s 2010, and the week before graduating from MAPH, I walk into an art gallery with my best friend. We’re intellectual equals, this friend and I, but I’ve studied art history formally and he hasn’t, and he is painfully aware of this fact. He doesn’t form an opinion without immediately turning to me for confirmation, validation, and general assurance that he gets it.

And I try to tell him that’s silly and self-defeating. I try to make my friend understand that he’s free to find a given piece of art life-changing or yawn-inducing or anything in between, and to drive that point home, I try to humanize the sainted artists whose work we’re both trying to get.

Penitent Hour – Ruth Gregory

 

I joke about Marcel Duchamp being foremost a provocateur and a jerk (which he was), and about how so many pre-Renaissance paintings feature baby Jesuses who look like Mikhail Gorbachev in miniature (which they do). But that just makes things worse. What my friend hears is simply that I know lots of stuff, and that he should shut up because he doesn’t know nearly as much stuff as I do. He stops offering opinions, and so I clam up, too. We walk around in silence for a while.

This time next year, I’ll be the Founding Director of a new, online art gallery. I’ll be clicking that last “OK” button that will peel back the Under Construction page from our website, and I’ll be thinking about my friend, and about how badly I want to help smart-but-intimidated people like him find artwork that they’ll love.

More about Drew’s work running Gray Blush Gallery after the jump. . .

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MAPH Featured in the New Issue of Tableau

October 7th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Alumni Writers

MAPH Alumni Writers during the 2010 Alumni Weekend

Most of you will be getting Tableau (the Humanities Division Magazine) in the mail in the near future.  However, it is worth noting  now the thoughtful article on the history of MAPH and the first 15 years of the program, by A-J Aronstein (MAPH ’10) featured prominently in this issue.  If you don’t want to wait to get your copy you can read the article online now.

 

The memorable sign at Clark Street Ale House

If you are feeling fond memories of your MAPH years you have the opportunity to catch up with your fellow alumni at next week’s alumni meet up Thursday, October 13 between 5:30-8:30 at Clark Street Ale House.

If you are not in Chicago or haven’t been in touch for a while drop us a line and let us know what you are doing or let us know if you want to set up an alumni get together in another city.

 

“A Career Shaped by 9/11″

September 12th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Mike Wilson (MAPH ’11) was this year’s MAPH intern at WBEZ’s show 848. Last week, he traveled up to Minnesota, where fellow MAPH ’11 grad and former Army Ranger Nick Fox reflected on a military career shaped by the events of September 11, 2001. Nick’s words speak for themselves. Hope you check it out.

Nick is one of many former military officers and enlisted men and women who have come to the program after serving. Many thanks to all of you. We have you in our thoughts.

Impressions from South Africa, Curated by Judy Hecker (MAPH 97)

August 15th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Check out this video featuring Judy Hecker (MAPH 97), Associate Curator in the Prints and Illustrated Books Department at MoMA in New York. She gives an introduction to her most recent curatorial effort, Impressions from South Africa, which runs through August 29. Judy studied art history at the University of Chicago as a MAPHer in the program’s inaugural class. Keep an eye out for her upcoming profile in Tableau. The cover story of the  fall issue will be “A Brief History of MAPH” offering some perspective on the successes and challenges that the program has faced since its inception.

WBEZ’s Resident Brit (what a ham) Mike Wilson

August 15th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Check out Mike Wilson, this summer’s MAPH intern at WBEZ’s Chicago News Magazine 848. He complains about [slash] lovingly describes watching “football” in America….as a foreigner. Listen to Mike’s soothing accent, which fits in perfectly with the NPR set. There are other silly accents in his piece too.

And, when you’re done, imagine yourself working at NPR and figure out your own NPR name.

Summer on AfterMAPH

July 13th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

MAPH Beach, on the northern side of Promontory Point. A popular site for recent-alumni watching, and laying in the sun like an iguana.

Summer!

The long hangover from Graduation and Reunion is beginning to subside. Thanks to everyone who made our end of the year events such a success. For those of you who couldn’t make it to Reunion, we hope to see you at the upcoming alumni happy hours at what has become the official MAPH Alumni watering hole: Clark Street Ale House. Info on dates to follow.

As far as big days in summer go, today is a big day in MAPHCentral. The class of 2012 is being added to the  MAPH and MAPH-etc lists, which means that the latest MAPH alums are being added to IRONY, the alumni list. Big.

To our newly-minted alumni (and any new students who want to get a better idea of who our alumni are), don’t forget to join several of our social networking groups. Rather than spamming alumni on Irony, messages from MAPHCentral about events and alumni news will appear only on Facebook. We will send ONE quarterly Alumni Newsletter to Irony, but if you want regular updates, be sure to do the following:

  • “Like” the MAPH Facebook Page (and while you’re at it, tell five of your friends about it! We’ll have 1600 alumni by next June, and we’d love to have as many MAPHers on the Facebook page).
  • Follow @MAPH_Alumni on Twitter
  • Join the official MAPH-only LinkedIn Group
  • Keep reading AfterMAPH for alumni profiles, tips about careers and networking, and other news from campus.

And, as always, if you have any questions or just want to check in, email me at ajaronstein@uchicago.edu. We’re working on developing even more ways for alumni and current students to work together, so stay tuned.

 

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