“The Nervous Writer” by Steven Flores (MAPH ’10) in Contrary

April 9th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

 

A guest post by Jeff McMahon, MAPH Writing Advisor (MAPH ‘ 02)

S.W. (Steven) Flores (MAPH ’10) has a story in the current issue of Contrary that satirizes creative writing workshops at their less than optimum. Flores is a second-year MFA student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.nervous writer

His story is in no way reflective of the UW-Madison MFA, he says, which he “loves to death!”, or of workshops at Chicago, but the story may be influenced by some other workshops he’s experienced.

“And, really, it’s just fiction.”

Oh, but is fiction ever just fiction? » Read the rest of this entry «

Stephen Tapert (MAPH ’02) Announces Book and Exhibition at The Museo Nazionale del Cinema in Turin

March 21st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Tapert_CoverFilm historian, writer, and filmmaker Stephen Tapert, who earned his M.A. from The University of Chicago in 2002 and later worked at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, is set to curate his first exhibition at the world’s largest film museum: The Museo Nazionale del Cinema in Turin, Italy. » Read the rest of this entry «

LA MAPHers: Catch Young Joon Kwak’s (MAPH ’10) MFA Thesis Exhibition TODAY!

March 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

YOUNGJOONToday is the last day to see the exhibition! You can also see some of Young Joon’s work in Issue 1 of Colloquium.

Mutant Salon: Who Are Worth Our Love

Young Joon Kwak
MFA Thesis Exhibition

March 11 – March 17, 2014

Mutant Salon: Who Are Worth Our Love will present new sculpture, photo, video, performance, and collaborative works by Young Joon Kwak, in addition to offering attendees haircuts and other beauty treatments with Marvin Astorga & Elisa Harkins at Mutant Salon.

USC MFA Gallery
Graduate Fine Arts Building
3001 S. Flower St.
Los Angeles, CA 90007
(Entrance on 30th St. between Flower St. and Figueroa St.)

Gallery hours Mon-Sun, 10a-5p (or by appointment)

  » Read the rest of this entry «

Marooned! with Matt and Bill

March 6th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

 

mza_9061123935916540415.170x170-75 Download Marooned! with Matt & Bill, a new podcast by and for graduate students.  It’s about graduate student life and all things academic. Features Bill Hutchison (MAPH ’12) and Matt Hauske (current MAPH preceptor). Free on iTunes – leave a review!

AWP 2014: On Giving/Getting Permission

February 28th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

“Find the place that scares you most and run to it.” — Eric McMillan (MAPH ‘10) on writing and, well, life

Talking Craft: (from left) Evan Stoner ('14), Hao Guang Tse ('14), Andy Tybout ('14), Chris Robinson ('14), Joel Calahan ('05, current preceptor), Eric McMillan ('10), Hilary Dobel ('09)

Talking Craft: (from left) Evan Stoner (’14), Hao Guang Tse (’14), Andy Tybout (’14), Chris Robinson (’14), Joel Calahan (’05, current preceptor), Eric McMillan (’10), Hilary Dobel (’09)

Last night, while leading eight current MAPH creative writers on an uphill March from the Seattle’s Washington State Convention Center to Von Trapp’s in Capitol Hill, I was marveling (aloud, perhaps unfortunately for my companions) about what going to the AWP conference can do for an aspiring writer. We were on our way to the second-ever MAPH/UChicago Alumni offsite reading at AWP. Earlier that morning, my colleague A-J Aronstein and I had stopped by a panel featuring the poet and teacher—and reader at last year’s offsite event—Shaindel Beers (MAPH ‘00) entitled the “Art of Difficulty.” Using beautiful language, Shaindel described teaching poetry students in prisons, schools, etc. as finding a way of “giving permission.” To write, one has to believe that they have something worth saying, a voice worth hearing. To Shaindel, it is a writing teacher’s job to nurture that belief, to create a space for it to thrive.

MAPH on the march!

MAPH on the march!

I felt this way last year when I attended the conference as a student, and I feel it even more this year as an alum: what AWP does best is a lot like what MAPH does best. » Read the rest of this entry «

Alumni Blog Spotlight: Selective Viewing by Kate Blair

February 7th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

GH_112W

Pipilotti Rist, Zimmer –Interactive video art installation, 1994/2000/2007. From Selective Viewing.

Kate Blair (MAPH ’13) writes about her continuing exploration of film, video, and other visual media on her blog Selective Viewing.  It includes reviews and » Read the rest of this entry «

MLA Meet-up! Come have a drink with us Saturday.

January 8th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

The Hubbard Inn, site of the MAPH meet-up!

The Hubbard Inn, site of the MAPH meet-up!

The MLA Convention begins tomorrow in Downtown Chicago.  This means that many of you will be in town » Read the rest of this entry «

Archivist as Gatekeeper: Liisa Freeh (’13) on the MAPH Internship at the Newberry Library

December 16th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

quincy

From the Newberry’s CB&Q Collection

My experience in MAPH taught me the relevance of archival work and the way it breathes life into the arguments I want to make in my field. My MAPH internship made me a participant, a gatekeeper, in that archival work. As an intern in the Department of Special Collections at the Newberry Library, I have been working on the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad Collection. My internship coincided with the last few months of the multi-year project of processing this large collection. My primary responsibility was the processing and arrangement of correspondence between land agents, and various parties involved in land transactions. CB&Q land agents wrote to businessmen, firms that sold land to other individuals, lawyers, small businesses, and countless hopeful farmers. These thousands of letters all deal with land transactions, but they also track a living history. In reading and processing these letters, I have been able to form a picture of CB&Q’s part in American corporate growth, as well as the development of countless small towns across the United States.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Blurred Lines*: A Critical Examination of the Trans/Cis Dichotomy

October 2nd, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

a guest post by Nicole Rea, MAPH’s 2013 recipient of the Rafael Torch Memorial Fellowship

What makes you interested in transgender issues?” “So then, are you cis or are you trans?” As a woman perceived to be “cis” doing work that centers on issues faced by the transgender community, these are questions that I’m asked regularly. And, while they annoy me at times (okay, nearly all of the times), I understand their impetus. “Trans issues” are still viewed marginally, if at all, as serious problems in American society. Despite continued barriers to healthcare, housing, and legal resources as well as alarmingly high rates of suicide and drug use, America continues to casually misunderstand the term “transgender” and consequentially dismiss individuals who identify as such. Such dismissal has in turn created a dangerously prejudicial and at times outright violent environment in which trans folk are forced to live.  Beyond all of this, I also realized first-hand in a recent medical advocacy training session that transgender persons are often unfortunately pushed to the outskirts of even the LGBTQ purview, as well. » Read the rest of this entry «

Molly Foltyn (’13) on the Browne & Miller Internship: Book People

September 27th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

429382_266056320135082_1606273352_n

Browne & Miller is located in the historic and lovely Fine Arts building on Michigan Avenue.

When I was an undergrad, I interned at a production company in Los Angeles.  I answered phones, made sure the coffee pot was always full, battled daily with the copy machine, and was once awarded the great responsibility of driving to Saks Fifth Avenue to pick up not one, but three pairs of pants for Samuel L. Jackson.  I mention this not to brag (although if you’re impressed, who could blame you?), but to demonstrate that what has really distinguished my experience as an intern at Browne & Miller Literary Associates is the fact that my summer here has been more rewarding, informative and valuable than I ever believed was possible in an internship. » Read the rest of this entry «